Stroke-Warning-Signs-You-Shouldn’t-Ignore

Strokes are attacks which occur when there’s disturbed blood circulation in a part of the brain. The condition is very serious and is the 4th leading cause of death in the USA and the leading cause of handicap in the country.

Strokes can be divide into two categories – ischemic and hemorrhagic. Ischemic strokes are strokes that occur due to a constriction or blocking of the brain canals, while hemorrhagic strokes are less common and occur due to bleeding in the brain.

In order to prevent damage, you need to learn to recognize the signs of stroke and seek medical attention immediately. The most common symptoms of the condition are loss of balance, trouble speaking, difficulties understanding, numbness in the arms, legs or face, especially on one side. Other symptoms include paralysis, vision problems and depression.

Learning what the F.A.S.T acronym means will help you recognize the symptoms of stroke early.

  1. Face

Try noticing if one side of your face sags suddenly;

  1. Arms

See if you can lift your arms without a problem;

  1. Speech

Try saying a phrase and check if your speech is odd;

  1. Time

Every single minute counts – seek immediate medical attention if you think you’re having a stroke.

The warning signs of stroke occur fast and without notice, which is why you shouldn’t be wasting any time! Call an ambulance right away so you can get proper and timely medical attention.

If you experience the symptoms and they disappear after a few minutes, you should still visit a doctor as these short episodes are transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) which are a sure sign of a stroke that will occur later.

People often confuse the signs of stroke and migraine – this is how to recognize them:

  • The warning signs of strokes occur suddenly, while migraine symptoms occur gradually and spread;
  • Sometimes, symptoms of a migraine appear in the form of added stimuli, (flashing lights or zigzag forms). But in contrast, TIA signs normally start with unpleasant symptoms such as hearing loss, loss of vision, and loss of power in the limbs.

Strokes can affect everyone, but these factors greatly increase the risk of stroke:

High blood pressure

Smoking

Diabetes

Age over 55

Blood and heart problems, atrial fibrillation

Migraines with mood changes

Family history of strokes

You can avoid stroke with a healthy and balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains while also exercising regularly.